La Bohème Review

Yes, I am at heart a musical theatre fan. There are moments where you want to see something else. One of the musicals I fell in love with was Rent. Not only is Rent one of my favorite and meaningful musicals-it led me to wanting to see something else. I soon learned that Rent was based off of the tragic opera, La Bohème. Ever since, I wanted to see that Opera- yes, you saw that right- someone who loves musicals really wanted to see an Opera.

Opera Carolina does use Blumenthal Performing Arts, and this year, they decided to do La Bohème. When I found out about that, I know what I was thinking. While I still wanted to see the musicals, I still wanted to see La Bohème- that was something that felt like forever. La Bohème is the tragic love story between Rodolfo and Mimi.

Cast:

Adam Smith: Rodolfo

Stefanna Kybalova: Mimi

Peter Morgan: Colline

Keith Harris: Schaunard

Giovanni Guagliardo: Marcello

Corey Raquel Lovelace: Musetta

Songs-Spoilers (even though expected)

When it comes to the La Bohéme songs, the ones I loved the most were the ones that Mimi and Rodolfo sang. No joke- after all, they are the main couple, and it is their story after all. These two truly do love each other, and that is strongly expressed in their songs; even in the end. I nearly almost lost it in the end right when Rodolfo knew Mimi was dead- seriously, I did. I literally did not want it to end that way- I wanted them to stay together-their songs truly made me not want to end like that. Tragic love stories are rough.

Storyline

Like any storyline, it needs to be one you need to stay invested in. La Bohème’s works. There are the emotions of grief, pain, and heartbreak. There are moments of comic relief- one of which comes at JUST THE RIGHT TIME. Literally, Rodolfo, Colline, Schunard, and Marcello were having a happy time in their apartment right before Mimi arrives dying (Musetta arrives too). So- just the right time. What I love about the ending (despite taking forever)- is that at least Mimi dies with Rodolfo by her side. These two truly did love each other despite some complications- that is a HUGE reason why I love their relationship and this storyline.

Acting

For some reason, which was good, I was most attached to Adam and Stefanna- the Rodolfo and Mimi. That was probably why I wanted Rodolfo and Mimi’s relationship to not fail despite knowing it was to be. Out of everyone in the group, Mimi is the most vulnerable and fragile. Literally at the end, Rodolfo was extremely devastated- I could see it, and I literally nearly lost it.

Sets

Well, each act; which was four acts to my surprise. Each act ended up being a completely different set- that was why those all of those acts. I loved all of them from the loft where Rodolfo and his friends life; the market; and outside of where Musetta lives. You actually can see it snow.

Overall Impression:

Okay, I love La Bohéme. Beautiful love story- what I love is while it mainly is a tragic love story is that there is a second that is lighter in nature. My favorite Opera. Here’s what I can say: tragic operas are not the same as tragic musicals. Only saying that due to operas’ reputation for being tragic.

For some reason- I feel like tragic love stories can be more difficult than a typical tragedy see unfold. Especially if you have fallen in love with the couple and the story itself.

5 thoughts on “La Bohème Review

  1. So cool that you had the opportunity to watch La Bohème! Sounds like you had a really good time. Opera can be a lot of fun sometimes and I’m hoping that I can find more opportunities to watch operas!

    Like

    • La Bohème was the main opera I wanted to see. Rodolfo and Mimi is one of my favorite couples- one of the reasons why I love this opera (I think my love for Roger and Mimi is part of the reason).

      Crazy how just a love for another musical led me to this opera.

      Liked by 1 person

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