Classic Mystery Prompt #5

This was one of my the Classic Remarks posts.

What is your opinion of prequels or sequels written for classic works that are out of copyright (i.e. not written by the original author)? Should authors be able to use other writers’ characters and plots for their “own” stories? Are there any classic prequels or sequels you recommend?

It really depends on the book. If it was a series, I would probably would not like the idea. For Standalone, most likely I wouldn’t want it be a prequel or a sequel. I would prefer if it was a standalone, but this can be really difficult. I probably wouldn’t want the exact same names, places, or same worlds- would want it to feel extremely different. However, still need a couple things similar, but not way too much where you don’t see anything similar.

Darrow-Owens is a Women group at my church- meals are served, and each week, a different speaker comes. This time, it belonged to to the owner of Park Road Books, a bookstore I love, and one of the books she spoke of did belong to Spinning Silver.

Yes, I struggle with retellings, which means would probably be ignored. However, I did find one retelling I really loved. It was a Rumplstilskin (can’t spell the name) retelling. It was Spinning Silver by Naomi Novik. I already read her Uprooted—it was a combo of already loving one of her books and the blurb.The book feels very original- the characters, the world, and the plot all felt original. While I saw aspects of the original, it never once felt like a retelling.

4 thoughts on “Classic Mystery Prompt #5

  1. I really enjoyed Novik’s Uprooted, but have yet to read Spinning Silver. I have heard plenty of good things about it, however. Thanks for participating in Classic Remarks!

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  2. This is interesting! I like retellings (that I’ve read so far, anyways), but I don’t know how I feel about sequels to classic works, etc.! I’ve not read enough to really formulate an opinion, I think. I think there’s good potential there, and the idea is fun, but oftentimes (from what I’ve heard) they don’t turn out all that great. I’m open to reading one or two sometime, though!

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